Starmus | Beyond the horizon – Tribute to Stephen Hawking
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Beyond The Horizon
Tribute to Stephen Hawking
June 27 – July 2 – 2016
Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

Registration open by July 1st 2015

For info registration:
info@starmus.com | starmus2016@ch.kuoni.com

Since the very first Homo Sapiens looked up at a star-filled sky we have been awestruck by the vastness of the cosmos. Even today we remain humbled by the sheer immensity of space, especially as through our progress in physics and astronomy, we are now aware of the tremendous distances involved – even to our closest neighbouring stars.
The Starmus Festival is a combination of science, art and music that has featured presentations from Astronauts, Cosmonauts, Nobel Prize Winners and prominent figures from science, culture, the arts and music. Its an astronomical and artistic experience that will enhance your perception of your place in the Universe and change your life forever!

Stephen Hawking

Keynote Speaker Starmus Festival 2014

Neil Armstrong

Keynote Speaker Starmus Festival 2011
Let us hope that our grandchildren at our age can look back and say, “The 20th century was a century of advancement and improvement in technology, and the 21st century was a century of advancement and improvement in human character
Neil Armstrong, Starmus Festival 2011
I greatly enjoyed the STARMUS festival. It is a combination of science and rock music, both of which I love. I hope there is a STARMUS next year, and you invite me. In a world beset by so many terrible problems, and so lacking in solutions, STARMUS offers a ray of hope.
Stephen Hawking, Starmus Festival 2014

Discover the Cosmos and Change the World

Poster 2016 8
Astronauts, Cosmonauts, Nobel Prize winners, eminent researchers and prominent figures from science, culture, the arts and music will preside over a conference to both discuss and try to answer the big questions of the day

Keynote Speaker

Coming soon

Confirmed Speakers for STARMUS III

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking


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Stephen Hawking

Considered one of the most brilliant theoretical physicists since Albert Einstein, his work on the origins and structure of the universe, the Big Bang to black holes, has revolutionized the field of cosmology. Moreover, his best-sellers – A Brief History of Time (1988), The Universe in a Nutshell (2001) and The Grand Design (2010) – have helped popularize science and make it accessible to everyone… A Brief History of Time broke all sales records for books in a way that would have been difficult to predict. By May 1995 it had been in The Sunday Times best-sellers list for 237 weeks, breaking the previous record of 184 weeks, selling 10 million copies in ten years. This deed was recorded in the 1998 Guinness Book of Records. He was diagnosed with ALS a form of Motor Neurone Disease, shortly after his 21st Birthday. In spite of being wheelchair bound and dependent on a computerised voice system for communication he still manages to combine a family life (he has three children and three grandchildren) and his continued research into theoretical physics, together with an extensive programme of travel and public lectures. He also still hopes to travel into space one day! Stephen Hawking was born on 8th January 1942 (exactly 300 years after the death of Galileo) in Oxford, England. The son of a research biologist and a medical research secretary, his upbringing gave him a strong curiosity about the universe. He was drawn to physics and mathematics as the sciences that offer the most fundamental insights into the world. He studied natural sciences at Oxford University, where he was awarded a first, and then moved to Cambridge to begin a PhD in cosmology. Professor Hawking has received a dozen honorary degrees and has received numerous awards, medals and decorations, including the Order of the British Empire (1982), The Prince of Asturias Award for Concord (1989) and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2009), the highest civilian award in the United States. He is also a member of the Royal Society and the National Academy of Science. In 1979 he accepted the post of Lucasion Chair of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, a post once held by Isaac Newton. Stephen Hawking’s voice was used in the song “Keep Talking” on Pink Floyd’s last album “The Division Bell”.

Neil deGrasse Tyson


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Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil deGrasse Tyson was born and raised in New York City where he was educated in the public schools clear through his graduation from the Bronx High School of Science. Tyson went on to earn his BA in Physics from Harvard and his PhD in Astrophysics from Columbia. Tyson’s professional research interests are broad, but include star formation, exploding stars, dwarf galaxies, and the structure of our Milky Way. In 2001, Tyson was appointed by President Bush to serve on a 12-member commission that studied the Future of the US Aerospace Industry. The final report was published in 2002 and contained recommendations (for Congress and for the major agencies of the government) that would promote a thriving future of transportation, space exploration, and national security. In 2004, Tyson was once again appointed by President Bush to serve on a 9-member commission on the Implementation of the United States Space Exploration Policy, dubbed the Moon, Mars, and Beyond commission. This group navigated a path by which the new space vision can become a successful part of the American agenda. And in 2006, the head of NASA appointed Tyson to serve on its prestigious Advisory Council, which will help guide NASA through its perennial need to fit its ambitious vision into its restricted budget. In addition to dozens of professional publications, Dr. Tyson has written, and continues to write for the public. From 1995 to 2005, Tyson was a monthly essayist for Natural History magazine under the title Universe. And among Tyson’s ten books is his memoir The Sky is Not the Limit: Adventures of an Urban Astrophysicist; and Origins: Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution, co-written with Donald Goldsmith. Origins is the companion book to the PBS-NOVA 4-part mini-series Origins, in which Tyson served as on-camera host. The program premiered on September 28 and 29, 2004. Two of Tyson’s recent books are the playful and informative Death By Black Hole and Other Cosmic Quandaries, which was a New York Times bestseller, and The Pluto Files: The Rise and Fall of America’s Favorite Planet, chronicling his experience at the center of the controversy over Pluto’s planetary status. The PBS/NOVA documentary “The Pluto Files”, based on the book, premiered in March 2010. For five seasons, beginning in the fall of 2006, Tyson appeared as the on-camera host of PBS-NOVA’s spinoff program NOVA ScienceNOW, which is an accessible look at the frontier of all the science that shapes the understanding of our place in the universe. During the summer of 2009 Tyson identified a stable of professional standup comedians to assist his effort in bringing science to commercial radio with the NSF-funded pilot program StarTalk. Now also a podcast, StarTalk Radio combines celebrity guests with informative yet playful banter. The target audience is all those people who never thought they would, or could, like science. Tyson is the recipient of eighteen honorary doctorates and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal, the highest award given by NASA to a non-government citizen. His contributions to the public appreciation of the cosmos have been recognized by the International Astronomical Union in their official naming of asteroid 13123 Tyson. On the lighter side, Tyson was voted Sexiest Astrophysicist Alive by People Magazine in 2000. In February 2012, Tyson released his tenth book, containing every thought he has ever had on the past, present, and future of space exploration: Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier. Recently Tyson served as Executive Editor and on camera Host & Narrator for Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey, the 21st century reboot of Carl Sagan’s landmark television series. The show began in March 2014 and ran thirteen episodes in Primetime on the FOX network, and appeared in 181 countries in 45 languages around the world on the National Geographic Channels. Cosmos, which is also available in DVD and BluRay , has been nominated for 13 Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Documentary. Tyson is the fifth head of the world-renowned Hayden Planetarium in New York City and the first occupant of its Frederick P. Rose Directorship. He is also a research associate of the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. Neil deGrasse Tyson lives in New York City with his wife, a former IT Manager with Bloomberg Financial Markets, and their two children.

Brian May


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Brian May

Brian May, CBE, has a PHD in astrophysics from Imperial College, and was Chancellor of Liverpool John Moores University from 2008 to 2013. He has also published research articles in the field of the solar Zodiacal dust cloud. Dr May is most widely known as lead guitarist and founding member of the legendary rock band Queen. He is an active animal rights advocate and was appointed a vice-president of animal welfare charity the RSPCA in September 2012.

Lord Martin Rees


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Lord Martin Rees

Astronomer Royal. Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at The University of Cambridge.

Lord Martin Rees is a Fellow of Trinity College and Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge. He holds the honorary title of Astronomer Royal and also Visiting Professor at Imperial College London and at Leicester University. After studying at the University of Cambridge, he held post-doctoral positions in the UK and the USA, before becoming a professor at Sussex University. In 1973, he became a fellow of King’s College and Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy at Cambridge (continuing in the latter post until 1991) and served for ten years as director of Cambridge’s Institute of Astronomy. From 1992 to 2003 he was a Royal Society Research Professor, and then from 2004 to 2012, Master of Trinity College. In 2005 he was appointed to the House of Lords, and he was President of the Royal Society for the period 2005-10. He is a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is an honorary member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Pontifical Academy, and several other foreign academies. His awards include the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Balzan International Prize, the Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Heineman Prize for Astrophysics (AAS/AIP), the Bower Award for Science of the Franklin Institute, the Cosmology Prize of the Peter Gruber Foundation, the Einstein Award of the World Cultural Council and the Crafoord Prize (Royal Swedish Academy). He has been president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1994-95) and the Royal Astronomical Society (1992-94) and a trustee of the British Museum, NESTA, the Kennedy Memorial Trust, the National Museum of Science and Industry,and the Institute for Public Policy Research. He is currently on the Board of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study, the Cambridge Gates Trust, and has served on many bodies connected with education, space research, arms control and international collaboration in science. He is the author or co-author of more than 500 research papers, mainly on astrophysics and cosmology, as well as eight books (six for general readership), and numerous magazine and newspaper articles on scientific and general subjects. He has broadcast and lectured widely and held various visiting professorships, etc. His main current research interests are: High energy astrophysics — especially gamma ray bursts, galactic nuclei, black hole formation and radiative processes (including gravitational waves), cosmic structure formation and general cosmological issues.

Neil Turok


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Neil Turok

Neil Turok (PhD Imperial College London, 1983) was Professor of Physics at Princeton University and Chair of Mathematical Physics at the University of Cambridge before assuming his current position as Director of Perimeter Institute. In 2013 he was re-appointed for a second term and additionally awarded the Mike and Ophelia Lazaridis Niels Bohr Chair at the institute. Neil’s research focuses on developing fundamental theories of cosmology and new observational tests. His predictions for the correlations of the polarization and temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) and of the galaxy-CBR correlations induced by dark energy have been recently confirmed. With Stephen Hawking, he discovered instanton solutions describing the birth of inflationary universes. His work on open inflation forms the basis of the widely discussed multiverse paradigm. With Paul Steinhardt, he developed an alternative, cyclic model for cosmology, whose predictions are so far in agreement with all observational tests. Among his many honours, Turok was awarded Sloan and Packard Fellowships and the James Clerk Maxwell medal of the Institute of Physics (UK). He is a Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Fellow in Cosmology and Gravity and a Senior Fellow of Massey College in the University of Toronto. In 2012, Turok was selected to deliver the CBC Massey Lectures, broadcast across Canada. The lectures were published as “The Universe Within,” a bestseller which won the 2013 Lane Anderson award, Canada’s top prize for popular science writing. Born in South Africa, Turok founded the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) in Cape Town in 2003. AIMS has since expanded to a network of four centres – in South Africa, Senegal, Ghana, and Cameroon – and has become Africa’s most renowned institution for postgraduate training in mathematical science. For his scientific discoveries and his work founding and developing AIMS, Turok was awarded a TED Prize in 2008. He has also been recognized with awards from the World Summit on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (WSIE) and the World Innovation Summit on Education (WISE).

Kip Thorne


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Kip Thorne

Kip Thorne was born in Logan Utah in 1940, Kip Thorne received his B.S. degree from Caltech in 1962 and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1965. After two years of postdoctoral study, Thorne returned to Caltech as an Associate professor in 1967, was promoted to Professor of Theoretical Physics in 1970, became The William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor in 1981, and The Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics in 1991. In June 2009, Thorne resigned his Feynman Professorship (becoming the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus) in order to ramp up a new career in writing, movies, and continued scientific research. His principal current writing project is a textbook on classical physics co-authored with Roger Blandford. His most recent major movie project was Interstellar (directed by Christopher Nolan; screenplay by Jonathan Nolan and Christopher Nolan; produced by Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas and Lynda Obst; release date November 7, 2014); Thorne is an executive producer . Thorne’s research has focused on gravitation physics and astrophysics, with emphasis on relativistic stars, black holes and gravitational waves. In the late 1960’s and early 70’s he laid the foundations for the theory of pulsations of relativistic stars and the gravitational waves they emit. During the 70’s and 80’s he developed mathematical formalism by which astrophysicists analyze the generation of gravitational waves and worked closely with Vladimir Braginsky, Ronald Drever and Rainer Weiss on developing new technical ideas and plans for gravitational wave detection. He is a co-founder (with Weiss and Drever) of the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) Project and he chaired the steering committee that led LIGO in its earliest years (1984–87). In the 1980s, 90s and 2000s he and his research group have provided theoretical support for LIGO, including identifying gravitational wave sources that LIGO should target, laying foundations for data analysis techniques by which their waves are being sought, designing the baffles to control scattered light in the LIGO beam tubes, and — in collaboration with Vladimir Braginsky’s (Moscow Russia) research group — inventing quantum-nondemolition designs for advanced gravity-wave detectors. With Carlton M. Caves, Thorne invented the back-action-evasion approach to quantum nondemolition measurements of the quadrature amplitudes of harmonic oscillators—a technique now applicable in gravitational wave detection, in quantum optics, and in nanotechnology. With Anna Zytkow, Thorne predicted the existence of red supergiant stars with neutron-star cores (“Thorne-Zytkow Objects”). With Igor Novikov and Don Page he developed the general relativistic theory of thin accretion disks around black holes. With James Hartle, Thorne derived from general relativity the laws of motion and precession of black holes and other relativistic bodies, With Sung-Won Kim, Thorne identified a universal physical mechanism (the explosive growth of vacuum polarization of quantum fields), that may always prevent spacetime from developing closed timelike curves (i.e., prevent “backward time travel”). With a team of ten younger colleagues, Thorne invented tools for visualizing spacetime curvature. Thorne has been mentor for 52 PhD physicists, many of whom have gone on to become world leaders in their chosen fields of research. With John A. Wheeler and Charles W. Misner, Thorne coauthored in 1973 the textbook Gravitation, from which most of the present generation of scientists have learned general relativity. He is also a co-author of Gravitation Theory and Gravitational Collapse (1965) and Black Holes: The Membrane Paradigm (1986), and the sole author of Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein’s Outrageous Legacy (1994). Thorne was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1972, the National Academy of Sciences in 1973, the American Philosophical Society in 1999, and (as a foreign member) the Russian Academy of Sciences in 1999. He has been awarded honorary doctorates by Illinois College (1979), Moscow State University — USSR (1981), Utah State University (2000), the University of Glasgow (2001), Clarement Graduate University (2002) and the University of Chicago (2008), and has won the Lilienfeld Prize of the American Physical Society (1996), the Karl Schwarzschild Medal of the German Astronomical Society (1996), The Robinson Prize in Cosmology from the University of Newcastle (2002), The Albert Einstein Medal from the Albert Einstein Society in Berne Switzerland (2009), The UNESCO Niels Bohr Gold Medal from UNESCO (2010), The Common Wealth Award in Science (2005), the American Institute of Physics Science Writing Award in Physics and Astronomy (twice: 1969 and 1994), the Priroda [Russian] Readers Choice Science Writing Award (1989 and 1990), the Phi Beta Kappa Science Writing Award (1994), and the J.D. Jackson Award for Excellence in Graduate Education from the American Association of Physics Teachers (2012). He has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a Danforth Foundation Fellow, a Fulbright Fellow, and a Guggenheim Fellow; and he has served on the International Committee on General Relativity and Gravitation, the Committee on US-USSR Cooperation in Physics, and the National Academy of Science’s Space Science Board, which advised NASA and Congress on space science policy. In 1996–97 he organized and chaired the search for a new president of the California Institute of Technology, culminating in the selection, by the Caltech Board of Trustees, of the Nobelist-biologist David Baltimore.

Russell Schweickart


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Russell Schweickart

Russell L. (Rusty) Schweickart was born on 25 October 1935 in Neptune, NJ. He graduated from Manasquan High School, NJ; received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1956 and his Master of Science degree in 1963, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Schweickart served as a fighter pilot in the U.S. Air Force and the Massachusetts Air National Guard from 1956 to 1963. He has logged over 4000 hours of flight time, including 3500 hours in high performance jet aircraft Schweickart joined NASA as one of 14 astronauts named in October 1963, the third group of astronauts selected. He served as lunar module pilot for Apollo 9, March 3-13, 1969, logging 241 hours in space. This was the third manned flight of the Apollo series and the first manned flight of the lunar module. During a 46 minute EVA Schweickart tested the portable life support backpack which was subsequently used on the lunar surface explorations. On the mission with Schweickart were commander James A. McDivitt and command module pilot David R. Scott. Schweickart served as backup commander for the first Skylab mission which flew in the Spring of 1973. After the Skylab program, Schweickart went to NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC as Director of User Affairs in the Office of Applications. Prior to joining NASA, Schweickart was a research scientist at the Experimental Astronomy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His work at MIT involved research in upper atmospheric physics, star tracking and the stabilization of stellar images. His thesis for a master’s degree at MIT was an experimental validation of theoretical models of stratospheric radiance. Schweickart was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1969) and the Federation Aeronautique Internationale De La Vaux Medal (1970) for his Apollo 9 flight. He also received the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Special Trustees Award (Emmy) in 1969 for transmitting the first live TV pictures from space. In 1973 Schweickart was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for his leadership role in the Skylab rescue efforts. He is a Fellow of the American Astronautical Society and the International Academy of Astronautics, and an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Schweickart is an Honorary Trustee and a Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. He is a retired business and government executive and serves today as Chairman of the Board of the B612 Foundation. The organization, a non-profit private foundation, champions the development and testing of a spaceflight concept to protect the Earth from future asteroid impacts. Schweickart’s satellite and telecommunications work involved him in the development of international communications regulations and policies, including participation in the 1992 and 1995 World Radiocommunications Conferences (WRC) of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). He served at the 1995 WRC as a U.S. delegate. He also worked extensively in Russia and the former Soviet Union on scientific and telecommunications matters. Schweickart is the founder and past president of the Association of Space Explorers (ASE), the international professional society of astronauts and cosmonauts. The organization promotes the cooperative exploration and development of space and the use of space technology for human benefit. The ASE has a current membership of over 300 astronauts and cosmonauts from 29 nations. The Association’s first book, The Home Planet, with a preface by Schweickart, was published simultaneously in 10 nations in the Fall of 1988 and was an immediate international best seller. In 1987-88, Schweickart chaired the United States Antarctic Program Safety Review Panel for the Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Washington, DC. The resulting report, Safety in Antarctica, a comprehensive on-site review of all U.S. activities in Antarctica, led to a restructuring of the program, increasing the safety of operations in that hazardous environment. At the request of the National Science Foundation, Schweickart also served on the 1997-1998 United States Antarctic Program Outside Review Panel, which reported to the Whitehouse (OSTP) and Congress on the future of US facilities in Antarctica. The US Amundson-Scott South Pole station has recently been fully rebuilt as a result of this work. In 1977 Schweickart joined the staff of Governor Jerry Brown of California, and served in the Governor’s office for two years as his assistant for science and technology. In 1979 Schweickart was appointed to the post of Commissioner of Energy for the State of California and served on the Commission for five and a half years.

Chris Hadfield


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Chris Hadfield

“Good morning, Earth!” That is how Colonel Chris Hadfield – writing on Twitter – woke up the world every day while living for 5 months aboard the International Space Station. Through his 21-years as an astronaut, 3 spaceflights and 2600 orbits of Earth, Colonel Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into our collective consciousness not felt since humanity first walked on the Moon. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong,” Chris Hadfield continues to bring the marvels of science and space travel to everyone he encounters. Colonel Hadfield is a pioneer of many historic “firsts”. In 1992 he was selected by the Canadian Space Agency as a NASA Mission Specialist – Canada’s first fully-qualified Space Shuttle crew member. Three years later, aboard Shuttle Atlantis, he was the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in space, and the first Canadian to board a Russian spacecraft as he helped build space station “Mir.” In 2001, aboard Shuttle Endeavour, Colonel Hadfield performed two spacewalks – the first Canadian to do so – and in 2013 he was Commander of the International Space Station – the first and only Canadian to ever command a spaceship – so far. During his multi-faceted career Hadfield has intercepted Soviet bombers in Canadian airspace, lived on the ocean floor, been NASA’s Director of Operations in Russia, and recorded science and music videos seen by hundreds of millions. A heavily decorated astronaut, engineer, and pilot, Colonel Hadfield’s many awards include receiving the Order of Canada, the Meritorious Service Cross, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He was named the Top Test Pilot in both the US Air Force and the US Navy, and has been inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame. He is the author of two internationally bestselling books, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth and You Are Here, and has been commemorated on Canadian postage stamps, Royal Canadian Mint coins, and on Canada’s newest five dollar bill (along with fellow astronauts Steve MacLean and Dave Williams).

Harry Kroto


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Harry Kroto

Francis Eppes Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University where he is carrying out research in nanoscience and cluster chemistry. Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1996.

Adam Riess


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Adam Riess

Adam G. Riess is a Professor of Astronomy and Physics at the Johns Hopkins University and a Senior member of the Science Staff at the Space Telescope Science Institute, both in Baltimore, MD. His research involves measurements of the cosmological framework with supernovae (exploding stars) and Cepheids (pulsating stars). In 1998 Dr. Riess led a study for the High-z Team which provided the first direct and published evidence that the expansion of the Universe was accelerating and filled with Dark Energy (Riess et al. 1998, AJ, 116, 1009), a result which, together with the Supernova Cosmology Project’s result, was called the Breakthrough Discovery of the Year by Science Magazine in 1998. On the ten year anniversary of this discovery, Symmetry Magazine reprinted the key page from his lab notebook showing the first indication, here, that the expansion of the Universe was accelerating. He followed this work with a number of studies to test the susceptibility of this measurement to contamination by unexpected types of dust or evolution. To this aim, Dr. Riess led the Hubble Higher-z Team beginning in 2002 to find 25 of the most distant supernovae known with the Hubble Space Telescope, all at redshift greater than 1. This work culminated in the first highly significant detection of the preceding, decelerating epoch of the Universe and helped to confirm the reality of acceleration by disfavoring alternative, astrophysically-motivated explanations for the faintness of supernovae (Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 655). This work also began characterizing the time-dependent nature of dark energy. It has been identified by NASA as the #1 Achievement of the Hubble Space Telescope to date. Nobel Prize in Physics, 2011 NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Award, 2011 American Physical Society, Fellow 2011 Einstein Medal, 2011 Gilman Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 2011 Thomson Reuters Citation Laureate, 2010 National Academy of Sciences, 2009 MacArthur Fellow, 2008 American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2008 Kavli Frontier of Science Fellow, 2007 Gruber Prize in Cosmology, 2007 Shaw Prize, Hong Kong, 2006

Eric Betzig


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Eric Betzig

After obtaining a BS in Physics from Caltech, Eric Betzig moved to Cornell, where his thesis involved the development of near-field optics — the first method to break the diffraction barrier in light microscopy. He then became a PI at AT&T Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ, where he further refined the technology and explored many applications, including high density data storage, semiconductor spectroscopy, and superresolution fluorescence imaging of cells. In 1993, he was the first to image single fluorescent molecules under ambient conditions, and determine their positions to better than 1/40 of the wavelength of light. Tiring of academia, He then served as VP of R&D in his father’s machine tool company, developing a high speed motion control technology based on an electrohydraulic hybrid drive with adaptive control algorithms. Commercial failure of the technology left him unemployed and looking for new directions. This search eventually culminated in the invention and demonstration of the superresolution technique PALM by Dr. Betzig and his fellow unemployed colleague and Bell Labs expatriate, Harald Hess. Since 2005, Dr. Betzig has been a Group Leader at Janelia, developing new optical imaging technologies for biology. Betzig was awarded the William L. McMillan Award in 1992 and the 1993 National Academy of Sciences Award for Initiatives in Research. He was offered the 2010 Max Delbruck Prize, but declined. Eric Betzig was awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for “the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy along with Stefan Hell and fellow Cornell alumnus William E. Moerner.

Alexei Leonov


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Alexei Leonov

On 18 March, 1965, Alexei Leonov became the first human to conduct a space walk. This historic event occurred on the Voskhod 2 flight. He was outside the spacecraft for 12 minutes and nine seconds connected to the craft by a 5.35 meter tether. At the end of the spacewalk, his spacesuit had inflated in the vacuum of space to the point where he could not re-enter the airlock. He opened a valve to allow some of the suit’s pressure to bleed off and was barely able to get back inside the capsule. From 1976 to 1982, Leonov was the commander of the cosmonaut team (“Chief Cosmonaut”) and deputy director of the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center. Leonov is an accomplished artist whose published books include albums of his artistic works.

108′

A gathering of eminent astronauts, astronomers, cosmonauts, physicists and engineers inside the GTC Roque de los Muchachos Observatory Dome, on the beautiful island of La Palma. The 10.4 meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) is the largest optical/infrared telescope in the world. 108-minutes of the latest news and discoveries in astronomy delivered first hand by World experts in the field. We will discuss some key problems that concern all humanity and will suggest some possible solutions.
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Roundtable discussion timed to last as long as the first ever journey into space by Yuri Gagarin in 1961.

Teide Starmus Party

In the magical surroundings of the Teide National Park you will feel as if you are walking on the Moon, with its surreal lunar-like landscapes. Even without the aid of a telescope you will be able to see the magnificent Milky Way stretching high above you from horizon to horizon.
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Observe the firmament, and feel as if you can actually touch the stars in the finest open air observatory on Tenerife.

Astrophotography

With the right equipment, a lot of preparation, a great deal of patience, and maybe just a little luck – you can capture the amazing beauty the night sky has to offer us.
Capturing ancient photons.
Capture that elusive award-winning night-sky image from anywhere on Earth and you could win an invitation to the Starmus Festival plus an hour to see the Universe as never before using the largest optical telescope on Earth – the GTC Roque de los Muchachos Observatory” on the island of La Palma.
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Sonic Universe

Music and dance, a celebration of life, an enrichment of the soul. Feet stamping upon Mother Earth, sounds creating other sounds.
An exceptional concert of modern music for your enjoyment. A message of harmony sent into space that will reverberate to the edges of the Universe. Sounds and emotions entwined forever in this unique experience.
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Paradise on Earth

From Mount Teide’s 3,718 metre summit down to the beach, from the mysterious “laurisilva” forests to the desert landscapes, from snow to sun, from well frequented tourist haunts to well-hidden locations – everything less than an hour apart – and with 20C average temperatures all year round.

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